Cheryl Deschenes | Plainville Real Estate, North Attleboro Real Estate, Wrentham Real Estate


If you plan to sell your house in the near future, now may be a great time to host a garage sale. That way, you can get rid of excess items, declutter your house and earn extra cash at the same time.

Ultimately, hosting a successful garage sale can be easy – here are three best practices to help you get ready for a garage sale.

1. Organize Your Inventory

A garage sale provides an excellent opportunity to sell a broad range of items – everything from kitchen appliances to gym equipment. As such, you'll want to sort through your belongings and separate must-keep items from those you can live without.

Organize belongings based on where they go in a home – you'll be glad you did. This will enable you to plan ahead for how you'll showcase various items during your garage sale.

Moreover, if you find some items are no longer usable, you should get rid of them altogether. Dispose of any damaged items, and you can immediately remove clutter from your residence.

2. Price Your Items Competitively

One person's junk is another person's treasure, and if you understand the true value of your belongings, you'll be able to price them competitively during a garage sale.

If you plan to sell electronics, jewelry or other high-end items at your garage sale, it often pays to perform research to learn about the true value of these items. Performing an online search of an item will help you see how various sellers around the globe are pricing the same item. Or, you can always contact local retailers directly for expert pricing insights as well.

In addition, consider the age and condition of an item before you price it. If an item looks brand new and performs great, you may be able to earn a significant profit from it. On the other hand, if an item shows signs of aging, you may want to lower your pricing expectations.

3. Promote Your Garage Sale to the Right Audience

Create flyers that you can post around your neighborhood to promote your garage sale. These flyers should include information about the date, time and location of your garage sale, thereby making it easy for those who see the flyers to find your event.

Don't forget to post details about your garage sale online too. Share information about your garage sale with family members and friends on social networks, and you should no trouble stirring up plenty of interest in your event.

Lastly, if you're planning to sell your house and need help getting your residence show-ready, you may want to consult with a real estate agent.

A real estate agent can offer expert tips to help you declutter your residence and ensure that your house is an attractive option to homebuyers. Furthermore, a real estate agent may even be able to help you prep for a garage sale, increasing the likelihood that you can make this event an instant success.


Believe it or not, home sellers may encounter many expenses after they list their residences. These costs include:

1. Home Cleaning and Maintenance Costs

Before you start showing your residence to prospective buyers, it often is beneficial to clean your house. As such, you may need to purchase assorted cleaning supplies. Or, you can always hire a professional home cleaning company to help you enhance your house's overall appearance.

Don't forget about home maintenance expenses too. Remember, you'll want to do everything possible to improve your house's curb appeal to ensure your residence stands out to potential buyers. And if you budget for the costs associated with fixing damaged home siding or performing lawn care tasks, you may be better equipped than ever before to find cost-effective ways to bolster your home's curb appeal.

2. Home Repair Costs

After you accept a buyer's offer to purchase your home, the buyer likely will request a property inspection. And if an inspection reveals myriad home repairs are necessary, you may be required to spend money to complete these repairs. Otherwise, you could put your home sale in jeopardy.

Oftentimes, it is helpful to conduct a property inspection before you list your residence. This will enable you to assess your home with a professional inspector and identify any problems. Then, you can perform home repairs prior to listing your residence and reduce the risk of possible home selling delays down the line.

3. Moving Costs

Once you sell your home, you will need to relocate your belongings from your current address to a new location. Thus, you should consider the costs associated with moving boxes and packing supplies and budget accordingly.

Furthermore, you may want to hire a professional moving company to help you transport your belongings from Point A to Point B. If you review the prices of local moving companies, you can find an affordable option that matches your budget.

There are many costs that you may encounter as you proceed along the home selling journey. But if you work with a real estate agent, you can receive comprehensive property selling support. And as a result, you may be able to cut down on potential costs throughout the home selling cycle.

A real estate agent is committed to doing everything possible to help a seller achieve the best-possible results. Therefore, a real estate agent will learn about your home selling goals and create a personalized property selling strategy for you.

Plus, a real estate agent is happy to respond to any home selling concerns or questions. This housing market professional will go the extra mile to guarantee you can enjoy a seamless property selling experience. With assistance from a real estate agent, you can handle any potential problems that may arise during the house selling journey.

For home sellers, it usually is a good idea to budget for potential property selling expenses. If you put together a budget, you could boost the likelihood of enjoying a fast, profitable property selling experience.


Photo by Quang Nguyen Vinh from Pexels

As a responsible homeowner, home maintenance should be at the top of your list of important things to do. However, with a busy life and a lot to manage, certain home-maintenance tasks can be easily disregarded. While there are some things you may be able to get away with for a while, there are certain neglectful actions that can really hurt when you decide to sell your home.

Neglecting HVAC System Tune-Ups & Upkeep 

There's a massive difference between what maintenance costs for an HVAC system and the cost of replacement. Since the HVAC system is one of the main operating units in the home, it is often one of the first things a buyer will want to know about. General maintenance checks by a professional technician will only cost you between $80 and $150; full-on replacement can be as much as $5,900 or more depending on the model. Buyers tend to shy away from homes that need major investments right after purchase, so do your part to properly maintain the unit.  

Neglecting Adequate Window Maintenance 

The windows bear a lot of responsibility in a home. They are openings for natural light, they (should) keep the cold and heat out and give dwellers a good view of the outside world. Windows should open and close freely, be efficient and be an attractive part of the house. Even something as simple as dirty windows can cause problems when a prospect visits the home for the first time. If the house gets inspected professionally by a prospect, they will check for: 

  • Signs of rot or deterioration
  • Missing or broken seals 
  • Glass pane soundness 
  • Proper insulation around the windows 
  • Proper drip cap installation
  • If you've neglected your windows for a while, it is best to pick a day and whip them into shape—right down to cleaning the glass until its crystal clear. 

    Neglecting Small Gutter Issues 

    The gutters of a home are such a small, easy-to-neglect thing, but their purpose is oh-so-important. If one of your gutters is not draining, for example, it can allow water to slip down into the spaces between the exterior cladding and the interior walls. Issues with rot are common due to this simple act of neglect, and it is definitely an issue a home inspector will notice. 

    Work with a Real Estate Agent to Prepare Your Home for Sale 

    The more well-prepared your home is for the market, and the better it is maintained, the higher your asking price can be and look logical to prospects. Working with an experienced real estate agent right from the beginning will help you get your home prepared properly. Reach out to an agent to get industry insight into what helps and hurts a home for sale. 


    You might want to believe that the home selling journey will be fast and simple, but high-pressure situations may arise that cause you to panic. However, there is no need to let high-pressure home selling situations get the best of you. Because if you know how to handle these situations, you can boost the likelihood of enjoying a quick, profitable house selling experience.

    Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you handle high-pressure home selling situations.

    1. Use Data

    A high-pressure situation may lead you to make a decision that causes you to miss out on an opportunity to achieve your desired home selling results. Fortunately, if you take a step back from a high-pressure situation, you can assess data to make the best-possible decision.

    Typically, a data-driven approach to selling a house is ideal. If you analyze home prices in your city or town and other housing market data, you can determine if a buyer's offer to purchase is "fair" based on the current state of the real estate sector.

    2. Analyze the Buyer's Perspective

    There are two sides to every situation, and if you review the buyer's perspective, you may be able to successfully negotiate with this individual. And as a result, you and a buyer may be able to come to terms on a home sale agreement that meets the needs of both sides.

    Although you may be tempted to walk away from a home sale if a buyer makes exorbitant demands, you should try to negotiate with this individual. If you assess the buyer's perspective, you may be able to gain unique insights into the property selling journey. Then, you can use these insights to negotiate with a buyer and boost the likelihood of finding common ground with this individual.

    3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

    Let's face it – selling a home can be stressful and exhausting, regardless of whether you are a first-time or experienced property seller. Lucky for you, real estate agents are available in cities and towns nationwide, and these housing market professionals can help you stay calm, cool and collected in high-pressure situations.

    Oftentimes, a real estate agent will work with you to craft a custom house selling strategy. He or she next will put this plan into action and collaborate with you throughout the home selling journey. By doing so, you can receive expert support as you navigate the home selling journey and achieve the optimal results as quickly as possible.

    Let's not forget about the negotiation assistance that a real estate agent can provide, either. A real estate agent is happy to negotiate with a homebuyer on your behalf. Thus, he or she can help you get the best price for your house.

    As you get set to navigate the home selling journey, it helps to understand what to expect after you list your residence. Thanks to the aforementioned tips, you can remain patient in high-pressure home selling situations and work diligently to maximize your house sale earnings.


    Selling a home takes patience. Especially when you’re balancing your time between settling into your new home, and keeping up with your work and family life. So, when you’ve finally gotten to the point of accepting an offer on your home, you’ll probably breathe a sigh of relief--and you should!  However, there are still a few more things that will need to happen and a couple of things to consider before closing the deal on your home sale.

    Contingencies on the purchase contract

    A purchase contract typically includes contingency clauses that are designed to protect the interests of both the buyer and the seller. These clauses mean that the contract is contingent upon the actions being completed before it can be legally valid.

    There are three main contingencies that will likely be included in the purchase contract before closing--inspection, financing, and appraisal.

    Inspection contingency

    The inspection contingency allows the buyer to have the home inspected by a professional before closing (the time should be specified within the contract, but the inspection should usually occur no more than two weeks after you accept the offer). A home inspection lets the buyer know what to expect in terms of repairs that the home needs now or will need in the near future.

    Financing contingency

    Since the vast majority of buyers will be purchasing their home through a loan, a financing contingency is included to allow the buyer time to secure their mortgage. Getting pre-qualified and pre-approved makes this process easier, but the buyer will still have to finalize and close on their mortgage before their financing is official.

    This clause exists to protect the buyer in the event that their mortgage application is denied, ensuring that they aren’t penalized.

    Appraisal contingency

    The third contingency most often found in purchase contracts is a home appraisal. The buyer will order an appraisal and then the appraiser will reach out to you to find a day to come and value your home.

    If the home is then appraised at the amount agreed upon in your contract, this contingency is met. However, if the appraisal comes up lower than the purchase amount, the buyer can renegotiate the price.

    Walkthrough and closing

    Once the appraisal and inspection have been met and financing secured, the buyer will have a chance to do a final walkthrough of your home. The walkthrough usually occurs no more than two days prior to closing on the sale. A walkthrough allows the buyer view the home one last time to ensure that the condition of the home hasn’t drastically changed since the home was inspected or appraised. So, make sure the buyer is aware of any changes you planned to make to the home before closing.

    Now you’re ready to close on your home sale. You’ll receive a disclosure form to review (read it carefully!) and sign. Once closing is complete, ownership of the home is officially transferred to the buyer.

    While the closing process does include several steps, it’s important to be available and cooperative along the way to ensure a smooth sale and transition into your new home.




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